UF MBA Engineering Partnership – Insights from our Engineers

2018-03-22T14:29:25+00:00 March 22nd, 2018|Categories: News & Events, Student Views|Tags: , , , |

The UF MBA program reserves a limited number of spaces to outstanding students from both undergraduate and graduate engineering programs. The Engineering Partnership allows students an accelerated admissions process into the full-time program. More information on the Engineering Partnership can be found here.

Michael Larkin, Class of 2019

Throughout the Industrial and Systems Engineering program at UF, I have always strived to be more than just a numbers guy. Sure, a love for math is what initially drew me to engineering, but through my business minor studies and involvement as a leader in Society of Sales Engineers, I have had an interest in understanding the business implications of the data analytics emphasized in the ISE program.

Upon learning of the Engineering Partnership scholarship for the UF MBA program, I thought the opportunity was too good to be true. To further my business acumen, gain a Masters degree by age 25 and make connections with Gators at top companies all over the country sounded perfect for my career goals. Through the recruitment process and from current students, I learned of the close-knit environment of classes, infinite opportunities for involvement, and immediate returns on investment through the top-notch career services. Fortunately, everything that was advertised has been proven true through my experience so far. I’ve made so many close friends, learned applicable skills in class, and was fortunate to already accept an internship offer with Intel in the Supply Chain department. This program has had an immediate impact on my career trajectory and I emphasize to any prospective students that UF MBA is the best decision you can possibly make for yourself.

Jaclyn Fine, Class of 2018

Even before graduating from UF with a double major in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and a minor in Communication Studies, I knew I wanted to be a leader in the workplace. I knew that I needed more than just extensive skills in applied calculus and physics to achieve that. I decided to pursue an MBA because I wanted to have the skills to think about an organization at a high level and make decisions that would not only enhance my department but would move the business toward its goals.

From the UF MBA program, I have learned to address strategic problems organizations face while using my technical background as a bridge between engineers and management, a communication gap that exists in many companies. The program has given me the tools to translate engineering solutions into business outcomes. I have learned not just how to communicate more effectively in a business setting but also what information is important to the different stakeholders I interact with each day.

I love the quantitative mindset required to be an engineer. I enjoy the critical thinking and problem-solving process to find real, workable answers. With an MBA under my belt, I can combine my technical background and new business acumen to affect change and improve business operations.

Patrick Doyle, Class of 2019

I decided to pursue an MBA because of advice from previous managers and previous work experience.  I had the opportunity as an engineer to work on projects involving financial analysis for various engineering units.  Through this experience, I realized how important it was to better understand finance and use both finance and engineering knowledge to make the most impact as an employee.  I chose the University of Florida because I was impressed with both the administration and students I met on my visits.  I felt like the administration, career services team, and students here at Florida gave me the best chance to grow and develop how I needed in order to succeed in the future.  So far during my time here, I have learned and improved not only my finance acumen but also my interviewing skills.  I hope to continue to grow these skills but also get involved with various clubs and organizations.  We have such a diverse group of backgrounds among the students here in the program and I hope to take advantage of that by learning from everyone’s knowledge and experience.

Nick Yap, Class of 2018

I’m a second-year MBA who interned at Ford Motor Company this past summer and will be returning there full-time after graduation. Entering the UF MBA program through the Engineering Partnership has worked out very well for me. While I didn’t have a lot of full-time work experience, I felt that my analytical background along with my internship/startup experience allowed me to contribute during class discussions and team projects. As an engineering student, I had little formal business education, so there was so much to learn, and the experience made me a more well-rounded candidate. Another benefit of earning your MBA before starting your career is that there is a lot to learn from those in the program who have more work experience. Overall, if you are an engineer wanting a more business-focused role or aspiring to be a manager in the future, I highly recommend applying for the Engineering Partnership.

Taylor Ball, Class of 2018

My background is based in Mechanical Engineering, the degree I received from Mississippi State University. Throughout my undergraduate experience, I had several technical internships that related to Pulp & Paper, Manufacturing, and Construction. However, my goal was to transition to a corporate finance role within an organization that had an operations base at its core. When I was applying to the UF MBA Program, my main concern was my lack of full-time experience and financial expertise due to my educational background having only a few business courses. The Career Services team shared with me that even though there were several companies who would view my profile and be turned off by the lack of experience, there were also several large firms that viewed my technical background as equivalent experience since it would help me quickly understand their business model. One of the main things I’ve learned through the curriculum to date, as well as my internship, is that it’s easier to teach finance/accounting to an engineer than it is to teach engineering to a finance major. I say that not to say finance is easy or the people that study it aren’t fully capable, but the point being companies place a lot of value in your critical thinking and problem-solving skills learned in an engineering curriculum. These firms also realize that you are a quick learner and are willing to put in the time to grasp the concepts that will naturally come easier due to your quantitative proficiency. Sure, there will be firms that don’t see how your skills translate, but plenty more see it as a huge plus on your checklist of candidacy. Overall, don’t let anyone tell you that your background isn’t beneficial. It may not be a perfect fit everywhere, but as long as you present yourself well and sell the skills you do have, plenty of great firms will chase you to be a part of their future!

COLLABORATION ORGANIZED BY:
Jaclyn FineMBA Candidate, Class of 2018
Jaclyn is a student in the two-year, full-time MBA program at UF. She served as Sustainability Chair from 2016 to 2017 and Blog Chair from 2017 to 2018.
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